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  • #2956 Reply

    Frannie Noble
    Keymaster

    Our Save the Children Research Specialist, Jonathan Seiden, replied:

    I would say it depends on your research questions. What are you trying to answer by collecting this data? Having said that, 120 is a pretty small sample, so I would probably recommend doing a full census of them.

    #3137 Reply

    Frannie Noble
    Keymaster

    The entire tool should be used in order to get reliable data at the population level. Using only one or two domains (e.g. emergent literacy and emergent math) and not all of the domains will undermine the reliability of the assessment.

    #2845 Reply

    Frannie Noble
    Keymaster

    IDELA has been translated in multiple languages and these translations are kept on our website. They are available to those who have signed the IDELA MOU.

    If you’ve already signed the MOU, use your login information to access the translations.

    If you are not yet an IDELA partner, complete the MOU or email idela@savechildren.org to begin the easy application to become a member. You’ll gain access to the full tool, translations and data collection resources.

    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by   HelpDeskAdmin.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by   Frannie Noble.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by   Frannie Noble.
    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by   Frannie Noble.
    • This reply was modified 2 days, 1 hour ago by   Frannie Noble.
    #2939 Reply

    Frannie Noble
    Keymaster

    No, IDELA is an open source tool available to the public free of cost. Save the Children does ask IDELA users to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to clarify how IDELA should be used and to encourage partners to share information and learning about ECCD. Information about the MoU is available on the IDELA website.

    #2958 Reply

    Frannie Noble
    Keymaster

    Lauren Pisani, a Research Advisor with Save the Children, also replied:

    Ideally we want the children and parents to be a 1-to-1 match. So for each child, you assess one caregiver. This allows you to look at many different aspects of equity in your analysis.

    #2942 Reply

    Jonathan Seiden
    Keymaster

    I would also add that we can take an “additive” approach to IDELA. If you feel like there are critical areas of development for your context that are NOT reflected in the tool, we encourage you to add additional activities. For example, in Bhutan we added questions about morality and how children would react in different situations.

    Of course, we don’t make it required that every user of IDELA uses every domain/task. We do highly recommend this.

    #3567 Reply

    Fabiola Lara
    Keymaster

    IDELA is not appropriate for children severe disabilities but you may choose to include children with mild disabilities in their data collection and not separate out their scores from those of normally developing children. This is usually in cases where the proportion of children with (known) disabilities is small and there is no specific programming targeted at supporting children with disabilities.

    #3568 Reply

    Fabiola Lara
    Keymaster

    Both translation and adaptation need to be taken into account before using IDELA in your context. IDELA is not a “ready-to-use” assessment, meaning that it not only needs translation to make sure children understand the activities they will be doing during the assessment but also adaptation needs to take place to ensure that objects discussed are familiar to children. See the adaptation manual for additional guidance on where it is appropriate to adapt.

    #3580 Reply

    Fabiola Lara
    Keymaster

    Yes, the IDELA should certainly be translated especially if the language that the children/caregivers will be assessed in is not English. If the children/caregivers will be assessed in a local or national language, then the tool should be translated into that language.

    #3582 Reply

    Fabiola Lara
    Keymaster

    Yes, and you should. It is very important that you pay careful attention to the instructions, and read all questions to children exactly as they appear. Throughout the guide you will see two forms of type or font. Bold type in boxes indicates things the assessor must say to the child out loud. Please read this type aloud to the child completely and exactly as it appears. This is important to ensure that the data will be collected in a standardized manner across all children.

    Italic type indicates instructions for the assessor. Do not read these instructions aloud to the child. You should follow these instructions exactly as they are written.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by   Fabiola Lara.
    • This reply was modified 2 days, 1 hour ago by   Frannie Noble.
    #3584 Reply

    Fabiola Lara
    Keymaster

    Lauren Pisani, a Research Advisor with Save the Children and one of the developers of IDELA, replied:

    The core IDELA tool does not include indicators on learning involvement or child-wellbeing, but we do try to address these important topics in a few different ways. The IDELA tool has optional items about children’s learning approaches (persistence, curiosity, attention, etc.). The items have not been validated as part of the core tool, but we are continuing to test and analyze their utility. In addition, we encourage teams to complement the IDELA tool with other measures that do measure these topics. For example, IDELA has been alongside classroom environment tools like the ECERS as well as child well-being measures that address children’s stress and psychosocial wellbeing

    #3586 Reply

    Fabiola Lara
    Keymaster

    Save the Children has developed a tool that looks at this specifically, classroom environments, called the IDELA-CE. It is a tool that is still in its infancy and has not completely gone through the testing and rigor that the IDELA has itself but is available to share.

    #3587 Reply

    Fabiola Lara
    Keymaster

    Yes, anyone who successfully completes the IDELA Enumerator Training can be an IDELA Enumerator. Enumerators can be, for example, hired external data collectors or research assistants, program implementation staff (i.e. field workers who usually provide support to specific field activities), early childhood staff or preschool teachers, and any other service provider who might be in a position to use this tool with children.

    #3591 Reply

    Fabiola Lara
    Keymaster

    Probing and repeating are critical components of administering the IDELA tool, but it is important to clearly understand when and how much is appropriate. Too little probing/repeating might bias results towards an incorrect response. A child could have known the answer but not understood the question or responded to the wrong question. Too much probing/repeating might bias results towards a correct response. A child who receives many opportunities to respond may be helped by the extra chances.

    Probing should be used to clarify your understanding of a child’s response. Young child are still developing their verbal abilities so sometimes they speak very softly or say things that are unclear. We probe to make sure we clearly understand the child and their intended response.

    #3262 Reply

    Fabiola Lara
    Keymaster

    Translation is important as children need to understand what they are being asked but adaptation for contextual relevance is equally important. It is highly advisable that an expert group reviews the IDELA tool well in advance of the first IDELA training. No major adaptations should take place during this time as this affects reliability. However, things like adapting the greeting and consent section, changing animals/fruits mentioned in the tool to others more familiar to children based on their surroundings, etc. is fine.

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