Mount Lebanon

Lebanon | 2017 | Save the Children

This sample includes data from 246 children and caregivers in the Mount Lebanon community of Lebanon. These data were collected as part of the baseline measure for a longitudinal study of children’s learning through a new preschool program combining Save the Children's Healing and Education through the Arts (HEART) program with Save the Children's Early Literacy and Math (ELM) program.


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Explore the Data: IDELA Domains and Equity

IDELA Domains and Equity

Average learning and development scores in IDELA domains

On average, children scored 29% correct on the IDELA assessment.

Distribution of Total IDELA scores

There was a large range in scores, but the most common score range was 0-10% correct.

Distribution of children’s ages

Most children in the sample were four years old.

Average IDELA scores by child’s age

On average, one additional year was associated with an additional 12 percentage points correct in overall IDELA score.

Distribution of children’s gender

51% of children in the sample were female. There was no significant gender difference in children’s average IDELA score.

Home Learning Activities

Caregivers are asked about the types of learning activities they engaged in with their children in the past week. For example, caregivers are asked questions about whether they read stories to their child, taught letters or numbers, and/or sang songs with their child. Home learning activities provide stimulation which can help children reach their full developmental potential.

How many types of learning activities did caregivers engage in with children in the last week?

Overall, 17% of parents reported engaging in 1-3 types of home learning activities with their child and 82% reported engaging in 4 or more activities. There was no significant relationship between home learning activities and Total IDELA score.

Learning Materials in the Home

Caregivers are asked about the types of reading materials and toys they have in the home. For example, caregivers are asked if they have storybooks, puzzles, and/or toys that children can practice counting with. Toys and reading material provide a stimulating environment for children to explore, which can help boost early learning and development.

How many types of reading materials and toys do children have at home?

Overall, 22% of parents reported owning in 1-3 types of home learning materials and 78% reported owning four or more types of toys and reading materials. There was no significant relationship between home learning materials and Total IDELA score.

Wealth

Caregivers are asked about the types of possessions that they own. The exact types of possessions asked about is contextual. For example, caregivers may be asked if they have a mobile phone, a bicycle, and/or electricity in the home. While not directly impacting early learning and development, children from wealthier families often have more opportunities.

How many types of possessions do families own?

Overall, 27% of parents reported owning no common household appliances, but 65% reported owning four or more types of home possessions. There was no significant relationship between home possessions and Total IDELA score..